Stories tagged predator

Going down: A golden eagle was captured on camera attacking a deer in Russia.
Going down: A golden eagle was captured on camera attacking a deer in Russia.Courtesy WSI
A camera trap in Russia was set up to capture the movements of tigers. What researchers found one day was much different: three images showing a golden eagle taking down a deer running in the snow. You can read all about it here along with seeing enlarged versions of these fairly graphic images. The sika deer being attacked is estimated to be around 90 to 100 pounds. The linked story also goes into good detail about the grisly events that transpired at the scene (also captured on camera) after the eagle left.

It's Friday, so it's time for a new Science Friday video. Science Friday
Science Friday
Courtesy Science Friday
This week...
"Reporting in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers describe a new predatory dinosaur from the late Cretaceous period in Europe. Balaur bondoc (Romanian for "stocky dragon") is huskier than its closest relative the Velociraptor and has unusual feet."

There was an interesting package of stories in Sunday's Star-Tribune about Isle Royale and the troubling circumstances of wolf and moose populations falling out of balance at the island national park in Lake Superior. For years, researchers have used the island as a case study of predator/prey interactions in an area untainted by human development. With moose numbers dropping and threatening the survival of wolves, what should they do? Let nature run its course or intervene to keep this lab vital? The link above will take you to stories, photos and videos of the situation. What do you think should be done?

For those Hawaiian albatrosses who just can't get the hanging of flying, there's always a tiger shark nearby to provide some extra motivation. Just watch the video below. If you want to skip the Mr. Rogers'-like commentary, mute the sound on your computer. I found it much better that way.

I think I spent too much time last night watching the NFL schedule preview shows. I'm clicking around the Net this morning and found this match-up: Tigers vs. Crocodiles. Watch the video and enjoy.

It's a little on the long side, but the video below shows amazing footage of a sea turtle hunting down a tasty snack. The camera work is with the same technology – the Critter Cam – that's given us awesome views of penguins, falcons and other predators at work.

Oct
21
2007

Cleaning up: A ladybug has its eyes on an aphid that it could likely snarf up and eat. A company called Planet Natural is providing ladybugs as a natural alternative to insecticides in getting rid of insect pests. (Flickr photo by teece)
Cleaning up: A ladybug has its eyes on an aphid that it could likely snarf up and eat. A company called Planet Natural is providing ladybugs as a natural alternative to insecticides in getting rid of insect pests. (Flickr photo by teece)
Just yesterday when I arrived home, there were a ton of ladybugs all over the front door. Little did I know they might be hanging around for more than the scenery.

A New York City apartment complex has turned to the little critters to tackle a big clean-up project on the 80-acre complex. It’s shipped in nearly three-quarters of a million ladybugs to eat other bugs that are destroying the ornamental landscaping features of the property.

The bugs come from Montana and have a big hunger for aphids and mites, insects that live and devour plants and flowers. The building complex owner is trying this natural solution to the problem in lieu of using chemical insecticides.

The natural method also helps to keep “the good guys,” other non-destructive bugs, around while chemical applications kill pretty much all of the insects in the area.

The apartment complex purchased the lady bugs from a business called Planet Natural. You can get a box of 2,000 ladybugs for $16.50.

On average, each ladybug can clear an area measuring about 19 inches square, eating about 50 nuisance bugs a day plus any eggs they may have also laid in the area. The commercial cleaners are also a different strain of ladybug than the Asian ladybugs that have become a common, swarming presence in urban areas.