Stories tagged lion

It's described as the first-ever live lion hunt to be webcast. Here's a link to video footage of the event for your lunch time Internet browsing enjoyment.

Have you been to church?: An escaped zoo lioness (not this one) rode out the brunt of Hurricane Ike with a bunch of humans in a little island church off the coast of Texas this past weekend.
Have you been to church?: An escaped zoo lioness (not this one) rode out the brunt of Hurricane Ike with a bunch of humans in a little island church off the coast of Texas this past weekend.Courtesy Aaron Logan
I seem to be on a religious kick this week, but here's a link to a cool story and photo about an unusual occurance when Hurricane Ike struck Texas this past weekend. An evacuee driving in his truck passed an escaped lioness from the zoo and put it in the back of his truck. They ended up riding out the storm with a bunch of other people in a church. The locked the lion in the sanctuary (it slept on the altar area) while the humans took refuge in another part of the church. From all accounts, the lioness was very well behaved during her time in the church.

Nov
09
2007

Bring 'em on: Come on you nasty sharks...I'll take you all on. (Flickr photo by Cayusa)
Bring 'em on: Come on you nasty sharks...I'll take you all on. (Flickr photo by Cayusa)
The Miami Dolphins on the NFL football field maybe struggling through a winless season so far, but their namesakes off the coast of California chalked up a big win a few months ago.

When surfer Todd Endris was surfing near Monterey on Aug. 28, a 12- to 15-foot great white shark attacked him. It’s not uncommon for surfers to be the targets of sharks, who look up through the water to see what they think is a tasty seal.

Three shark bites peeled skin off his back and had ripped his right leg down to the bone. Then to the rescue came a pod of dolphins.

The formed a protective ring around him, allowing Endris to get his wits about him, paddle to shore and get first aid attention on shore from a friend.

I heard Endris share his tale on the Today Show earlier this week. You can get the full report by clicking here. But my biggest question was left unanswered. Why did the dolphins intervene?

Science doesn’t have the answer yet, but cases of dolphins rescuing people go back to tales from ancient Greece.

Just last year, four lifeguards in New Zealand were saved from sharks by the similar action of a pod of dolphins.

One more interesting twist to the story, within six weeks Endris was back on his surfboard riding the waters off on Monterey again.

So what do you think is at play with dolphins coming to the rescue? Do you think they do this for other species as well, or just humans? Share your thoughts here with Science Buzz readers.

Nov
01
2007

The business end of a saber-toothed tiger: Not as dangerous as previously feared, but still, dangerous enough.  Photo by Brendan Atkins from Flickr.com
The business end of a saber-toothed tiger: Not as dangerous as previously feared, but still, dangerous enough. Photo by Brendan Atkins from Flickr.com

Scientists in Australia, using a computer and advanced engineering formulas, have studied the skull of the famous saber-toothed tiger and discovered it wasn’t as fierce as previously thought. Due to weaknesses in the skull, its bite was only one-third as strong as a lion’s of similar size.

Of course, one-third the strength of a lion is still pretty strong.

OTOH, the saber-toothed tiger has a massively powerful body. The researches speculate that, rather than biting its prey on the run as lions do, the big cat first wrestled its prey to the ground and then clamped down on its neck.

No word as to whether these Ice Age creatures will be reintroduced to North America. If so, they would have to compete with these Tigers, the fiercest of all time.

(Other scientists have tried to figure out why the saber-toothed tiger had such big teeth to begin with.)

(And yes, I know it’s not really a tiger, but like my grandmother always used to say, alliteration counts for a lot.)