Stories tagged Hatshepsut

Mar
18
2009

Rule like an Egyptian: This statue of Hatshepsut can be seen as at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. She posed as a man to rule as an Egyptian pharaoh from  1479-1458 B.C.
Rule like an Egyptian: This statue of Hatshepsut can be seen as at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. She posed as a man to rule as an Egyptian pharaoh from 1479-1458 B.C.Courtesy User:Postdlf
There were a lot of women trying to break the political glass ceiling last year. Think Hillary Clinton or Sarah Palin. And while their efforts were noteworthy, they were far behind the curve when it came to female leadership of a great nation.

April's National Geographic has a huge profile on Hatshepsut, the female ruler of Egypt from 1479 to 1458 B.C. who actually took on the appearance of a man to be able to lead the nation. That story is amazing enough, but the National Geographic piece goes on to tell about all the modern science that was used on a random, anonymous mummy to pin-point that it was the remains of this famous Egyptian leader.

It's a great summary of a project I've been a part of in the past year. We've been creating an exhibit called "Lost Egypt: Ancient Secrets, Modern Science." It will open Memorial Day time at COSI – a museum in Columbus, Ohio – and eventually travel here to SMM sometime on its six-year tour. A good portion of that exhibit will focus on how researchers can use modern technology – CT scanning and rapid prototyping to name two – to gather information on mummies without ever unwrapping them or doing physical damage to them.

If you're like a lot of people, you'll find ancient Egypt fascinating and want to check out this story on Hatshepsut or the Lost Egypt exhibit. Why do you think ancient Egyptian culture is so cool? Or what do you think of Hatshepsut's unique story? Share your thoughts here with other Buzz readers.

Jun
28
2007

After more than 3,400 years, the body of Queen Hatshepsut has been identified: Photo of the Temple of Hatshepsut by mike nl at Flickr.com
After more than 3,400 years, the body of Queen Hatshepsut has been identified: Photo of the Temple of Hatshepsut by mike nl at Flickr.com

The body of Queen Hatshepsut, who ruled Egypt from 1479 to 1458 BC, has been missing for centuries. Her successor and step-son, Thutmose III, wanted to erase all evidence of her reign, and her body was not interred in any of the elaborate graves built for other rulers.

But now her remains have been identified. A relic box marked with the queen’s insignia was found to contain a broken tooth. And a CAT scan done on an unidentified mummy showed that the tooth matched perfectly. Ongoing DNA tests seem to indicate that the mummy is a member of the royal family.

The kicker is that this mummy was found in 1903. But because it was just lying on the ground of a tomb, no one knew who it was, and everyone assumed it was no one important. Which just goes to show -- even for the dead, appearances can be deceiving.