Stories tagged earthquake prediction

Ozone is a triatomic molecule consisting of three oxygen atoms. Earlier this week, the scientific journal Applied Physics Letters published the article, Ozone generation by rock fracture: Earthquake early warning?, written by Raúl A. Baragiola, Catherine A. Dukes, and Dawn Hedges of the University of Virginia School of Engineering and Applied Science. If future research does confirm a correlation, an array of ozone detectors could be used to give early warning to earthquakes, as well as averting disasters in tunnel excavation, landslides, and underground mining operations.

University of Virginia Press Release: Study: Ozone From Rock Fracture Could Serve As Earthquake Early Warning

Oct
05
2007

Cracked up science: Rock samples recently collected along the San Andreas Fault in California could unlock some of the mysteries on what causes earthquakes. (Photo courtesy of the U.S. Geological Survey)
Cracked up science: Rock samples recently collected along the San Andreas Fault in California could unlock some of the mysteries on what causes earthquakes. (Photo courtesy of the U.S. Geological Survey)
What’s the secret ingredient for earthquakes? Scientists this week think they might have a new clue after getting rock samples from more than two miles deep in the San Andreas Fault.

It’s the first time researchers have been able to get geological samples from so far down in an active earthquake area and should give new insights into how faults and earthquakes actually work.

The big surprise was the significant amounts of the mineral serpentine that were found. It’s a soft mineral the geologists think plays a substantial role in the creation of earthquakes.

Some members of the research team describe the finds as the geologic equal to moon rocks. And they’re a hot property with hundreds of requests now coming in from universities and researchers wanting to get their hands, and eyes, on these specimens.

The collection process has extracted about a ton of rock. The samples are 135-foot-long cylinders that have a four-inch diameter and were bored out near Parkfield, Calif. That’s a region of the San Andreas Fault where earthquakes are common, but not too severe. Along with the serpentine, the samples also include large amounts of shale and sandstone.

May
25
2005

The United States Geologic Service has launched a website which shows the probability of an earth-shaking event in any spot for California over the next 24 hours. The model is most useful in predicting aftershocks — small tremblers that follow a large quake. Those large quakes remain almost impossible to predict. But knowing if an aftershock is due will help Californians prepare their homes and keep damage to a minimum.

Earthquakes occur when two pieces of the Earth's crust collide, divide, or scrape past one another. The dividng line between two such pieces is called a fault line. Many fault lines run through California, so they have lots of earthquakes. Minnesota has no fault lines, so earthquakes here are very rare.

Read more about earthquake forecasting