Stories tagged National Park Service

Mar
21
2010

Harriet Island March 15: A photo of Harriet Island from March 15, 2010
Harriet Island March 15: A photo of Harriet Island from March 15, 2010Courtesy Sharon Stiteler

I took this photo of Harriet Island in St. Paul on Monday, March 15, 2010 in anticipation of the rising waters of the Mississippi River. The flood forecast seems to change daily, if not hourly. As of Sunday morning, March 21, 2010 NOAA had the river at 16.3 feet, well above the 14 foot flood stage. You will notice in the above photo that the stairs to the river are still visible.

Harriet Stairs: The Mississippi River rising along the stairs at Harriet Island.
Harriet Stairs: The Mississippi River rising along the stairs at Harriet Island.Courtesy Sharon Stiteler

This morning, they were covered. This park visitor perched at the top to capture a photo of the rising water. The current is very fast and there's still quite a bit of debris flowing along.

Padleford Boats: Padleford boats being protected from debris during the 2010 Spring flood.
Padleford Boats: Padleford boats being protected from debris during the 2010 Spring flood.Courtesy Sharon Stiteler

Barges have been placed in front of the Padleford boats to protect them from debris. Here's a video of the current and some of the debris that has been blocked from banging the boats.

It will be interesting to watch the water this week. If you are in St Paul to watch the flood, stop in to the Mississippi River Visitor Center in the lobby of the Science Museum and chat with a Ranger about it.

Mar
18
2010

For hundreds of years, thousands of people have connected with the Mississippi River. Today, we sometimes forget that the Mississippi is always flowing through our fair cities, at least until it floods.

In this moment, the river can be an extraordinarily humanizing resource. When we stand together on the Science Museum's plaza, peek over the rails on Kellogg Blvd.'s parkland, or sit near the steps on Harriet Island, all gazing at the flooding river, we are not accountants, scientists, or novelists but everyday people witnessing an event that still produces the same awe, fear, romance, or dread that thousands of people for hundreds of years before us have experienced when they too watched or experienced a flood.

In future posts, my colleagues and I will chat about the impact of flooding on the Mississippi's landscape and try providing some historical perspectives on river floods.

If you'd like to learn more about our National Park Service unit, the Mississippi National River and Recreation Area, please visit us at www.nps.gov/miss.

-Ranger Brian

Check out our full feature on the 2010 Mississippi River flooding.