Stories tagged 2009

Jan
09
2010

I recorded this live with internet broadcast, on 09th January 2010 during the Closing Ceremony of IYA2009 | International Year of Astronomy. You can hear how Vincenzo Giorgio of Thales Alenia Space, the Principal Sponsor of IYA2009, International Year of Astronomy is saying hinhis address @ the closing ceremony of IYA2009 live from Padua, Italy

1.http://iya2009sl.blogspot.com/2010/01/ watch-iya2009-closing-ceremony-live.html

2. http://www.scienceblog.com/cms/blog/8988-watch-iya2009-closing-ceremony-live-padua-italy-29020.html

3. http://www.sciencebuzz.org/blog/watch-iya2009-closing-ceremony-live-padua-italy

Sep
19
2009

FluMist inhaler for H1N1 flu
FluMist inhaler for H1N1 fluCourtesy garrisonpao

Vaccine for swine flu is ahead of expectations

October is almost here, and so are more than 3 million doses of H1N1 flu vaccine. The vaccine is a the FluMist nasal spray type which is inhaled rather than injected. The nasal spray contains a weakened live virus, while injections contain killed and fragmented virus. The inhalation method gives a stronger immune reaction and is not recommended for pregnant women, people over 50 or those with asthma, heart disease or several other problems. The earlier than expected delivery will be be great for people in other high-risk groups though (health care workers, people caring for infants, and healthy young people).

Any type of flu can be deadly

In the United States a typical flu season is believed to kill about 36,000. The Asian flu of 1957 was blamed for the deaths of about 70,000 Americans. The pandemic H1N1 or 2009 H1N1 flu (we are not supposed to call it the swine flu) so far has not been bad. Flu activity is now “widespread” in 21 states, up from 11 a week ago. (Read more here - New York Times)

2009 H1N1 flu vaccine approved

"The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced Sept. 15 that it has approved four vaccines against the 2009 H1N1 influenza virus. The vaccines will be distributed nationally after the initial lots become available, which is expected within the next four weeks.
As with any medical product, unexpected or rare serious adverse events may occur. The FDA is working closely with governmental and nongovernmental organizations to enhance the capacity for adverse event monitoring, information sharing and analysis during and after the 2009 H1N1 vaccination program." FDA News Release

Aug
20
2009

Coastal watches/warnings and 5-Day track forecast cone for Hurricane Bill
Coastal watches/warnings and 5-Day track forecast cone for Hurricane BillCourtesy NOAA
The names for the 2009 hurricanes were announced a few days ago by the National Hurricane Center (NHC). The NHC has a list of names they draw from, that reuses names every six years or so, but if a storm is particularly bad a name will be retired. There are no "Q" or "U" names and they go alphabetically so when they get to Danny you'll know that's the fourth of the season. The names for 2009 are:

Ana, Bill, Claudette, Danny, Erika, Fred, Grace, Henri, Ida, Joaquin, Kate, Larry, Mindy, Nicholas, Odette, Pete, Rose, Sam, Teresa, Victor and Wanda.

(Interesting the names "Pete" and "Rose" are in succession.)

So far this year we're up to Claudette. Ana is old news already with the National Hurricane Center announcing yesterday that the storm had weakened so much they were no longer tracking it. Claudette is also weakening, but it had the distinction of being the first tropical system to reach land yet this season. Third in line is Bill, who has already become a category 3 hurricane. Follow Bill’s progress here.

Retired hurricane names.

El Niño has returned

How strong an El Niño will eventually develop and how long it is likely to last is not yet known. Learn more about El Niño in 2009 in ScienceNow Daily News.

The Texas Department of State Health Services announced today that they're attributing a second US death to the A/H1N1 virus. The Cameron County woman, who had unspecified underlying health problems, died earlier this week. The CDC also reported that, so far, 35 people have been hospitalized in the US. However, the new flu virus doesn't seem as dangerous as public health officials feared last week. And because of that, and because the strategy no longer seems to be containing the spread of the disease, federal officials rescinded the recommendation that schools close when they discover suspected cases of the flu.

Official CDC case counts

May
01
2009

A research group led by Dirk Brockmann at Northwestern University has created a computer model that predicts the spread of the 2009 H1N1 influenza virus in the US. (It uses a complex set of mathematical equations to describe the movement of people and virus.)

How can you track and predict the movement of something so small?: Follow the money, of course! (This is a colorized negative stained transmission electron micrograph (TEM) showing some of the ultrastructural morphology of the A/CA/4/09 swine flu virus. Got that? Good.
How can you track and predict the movement of something so small?: Follow the money, of course! (This is a colorized negative stained transmission electron micrograph (TEM) showing some of the ultrastructural morphology of the A/CA/4/09 swine flu virus. Got that? Good.Courtesy CDC/C.S. Goldsmith and A. Balish

(Brockmann was a guest on Minnesota Public Radio's Midmorning show today, and you can listen to it online.)

The good news is that, based on what we know now, and assuming that no one takes any preventive measures, we could expect to see some 1,700 cases of swine flu in the next four weeks. Because of the preventive measures being taken wherever a suspected case of H1N1 flu has popped up, we should actually see fewer cases. (You can see Brockmann's models here.) That's lousy if you're one of the folks who picks up the virus, but not a devastating number of cases. Of course, this is a rapidly developing, fluid situation, and things may change. Still, tools like Brockmann's model help to ensure that emergency supplies and other resources get to the places likely to need them most before they're needed.

Professor's Computer Simulations Show Worst-Case Swine Flu Scenario from Northwestern News on Vimeo.

Don't have faith in computer models? Well, a second research group at Indiana University is using another model, with different equations, and getting very similar results. That's a pretty good indication that the predictions are reliable.

You might remember Brockmann from a 2006 study that used data from WheresGeorge.com, a site that allows users to enter the serial numbers from their dollar bills in order to see where they go, to predict the probability of a given bill remaining within a 10km radius over time. That gave him a very good picture of human mobility, reflecting daily commuting traffic, intermediate traffic, and long-distance air travel, all of which help to model how a disease could spread.

Sharing water across boundaries
Sharing water across boundariesCourtesy jonnyboy2005

Transboundary water management

In 2009, the theme for World Water Day is "Shared Water - Shared Opportunities". Over 40 percent of the world’s population resides within internationally shared river basins. Click on this link to learn more about why resolving conflicts related to transboundary water resources are important.

Jan
31
2009

Ice storm Jan 09
Ice storm Jan 09Courtesy flickrized

Nearly 1 million still without power from ice storm

Imagine what you would do if you had no electricity, heat, or water for almost a week. Utility crews are trying to get power back on for nearly a million customers left without electricity by an ice storm that crippled parts of several states.

Lots of emergency aid is needed

American Red Cross said their organization had opened more than 34 shelters for some 2,000 people. One administrator is asking people to pack a suitcase and head south and find a motel because the elementary school cannot hold the 9000 needing shelter.

The storm that began in the Midwest had been blamed or suspected in at least 42 deaths, including 11 in Kentucky, nine in Arkansas, six each in Texas and Missouri, three in Virginia, two each in Oklahoma, Indiana and West Virginia and one in Ohio. Most were blamed on hypothermia, traffic accidents and carbon monoxide poisoning.

Another Katrina for FEMA?

Local officials grew angrier at what they said was a lack of help from the state and the Federal Emergency Management Agency. FEMA has shipped 50 to 100 generators to the state to supply electricity to such facilities as hospitals, nursing homes and water treatment plants. Emergency Management Director Randell Smith said the 25 National Guardsmen who have responded have no chain saws to clear fallen trees.

Learn more about Jan 09 storm

Source article: Yahoo News
Yahoo News has a slide show of more than 150 winter storm '09 photos.