Jul
14
2007

How do you rate? El Nino conditions to get numbers

In hot water: These thermal imaging maps show the difference between normal surface water temperatures and El Nino surface water temperatures in the Pacific Ocean. (Photo from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administraion Photo Library)
In hot water: These thermal imaging maps show the difference between normal surface water temperatures and El Nino surface water temperatures in the Pacific Ocean. (Photo from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administraion Photo Library)
As if our TV meteorologists didn’t have enough warnings and ratings to rattle our cages with, here come two more.

The Climate Prediction Center as announced that it has created a rating scale to measure the impacts up oncoming El Nino or La Nina weather patterns. The new ratings will likely first be issued starting this fall.

Not only will the weather patterns carry a rating on their severity, but warnings and advisories will also be issued through the new program, much like we get thunder storm or tornado warnings or watches. Here are the details:

• A watch will be issued when conditions are ripe for the creation of El Nino or La Nino patterns within the ensuing three to six months.

• An advisory will be issued when the conditions are underway.

• The rating scale will go from 1 to 5 and be done to measure the impact of the El Nino or La Nina after it’s passed, much like the F-scale used to measure tornados.

The strength of the weather conditions is determined by the warmth or coolness of the surface waters in the South Pacific. The names were given to the weather conditions by fishermen from Peru who noticed fluctuations in their catches based on the changing water temperatures.

The new scale will have a bigger impact on allowing researchers to compare weather conditions after they’ve happened, not in predicting how severe new ones will be.

Strong El Ninos and La Ninas can impact weather conditions worldwide. You can learn more about them at the Science Museum of Minnesota's Science on a Sphere display.

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