Nov
16
2011

High-Resolution Sonar Mapping of Mid-Atlantic Canyons to Assess Tsunami Hazards

If you look at the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s interactive map of nuclear power plants in the United States, you will see several in states bordering the Atlantic Ocean. This prompted the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to request the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), along with other governmental and academic partners, to research the potential for tsunamis to strike the U.S. Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coasts, and prepare maps using sonar (originally an acronym for SOund Navigation And Ranging). Note that the March 11, 2011 earthquake near Honshu, Japan, created a tsunami that resulted in a nuclear disaster that is still being remediated.

NOAA Research Ship Nancy Foster: Nancy Foster supports applied research primarily for NOAA's National Ocean Service and Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research.
NOAA Research Ship Nancy Foster: Nancy Foster supports applied research primarily for NOAA's National Ocean Service and Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research.Courtesy National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Through this research, initiated about five years ago, the leading potential source of dangerous tsunamis to the East Coast was identified as landslides, either originating in submarine canyons or on the continental slope of the submerged margin of the continent of North America.

According to USGS marine geologist Jason Chaytor, many years of data collection and integration of existing data sets was needed in order to produce seafloor maps with the resolution needed to identify all of the relevant features for this study. The first field effort of this project was a multibeam bathymetric mapping cruise conducted aboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Ship Nancy Foster from June 4 to June 16, 2011. Using echosounders installed on the hull of Nancy Foster, the science team mapped canyons and shelf regions at high resolution over more than 380 square miles (1,000 square kilometers) of seafloor from south of Cape Hatteras, located offshore of North Carolina, to the eastern tip of Long Island in New York.
Bathymetric Map of Continental Slope 150 km Southeast of New Jersey: High-resolution multibeam bathymetry collected in and between Baltimore and Accomac Canyons during the June 2011 cruise. Color key at left shows depths (in meters).
Bathymetric Map of Continental Slope 150 km Southeast of New Jersey: High-resolution multibeam bathymetry collected in and between Baltimore and Accomac Canyons during the June 2011 cruise. Color key at left shows depths (in meters).Courtesy United States Geological Survey


A number of submarine landslides, some previously unknown, were either partly or completely mapped. Characteristics collected include the size and number of landslides, soil and rock properties, the water depth they occur in, and the style in which they fail. This information is often used in numerical modeling of tsunamis generated by landslides.

The scientists detailed their findings in the September/October issue of the USGS newsletter Sound Waves.

Your Comments, Thoughts, Questions, Ideas

Anonymousn's picture
Anonymousn says:

wayyyy coooool

posted on Sat, 11/26/2011 - 5:20pm
squishey123's picture
squishey123 says:

interesting article :D

posted on Sun, 11/27/2011 - 5:48pm
AmberLynn's picture
AmberLynn says:

The tsunami in japan scared me buut it was ccool also

posted on Fri, 02/17/2012 - 7:47pm

Post new comment

The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly.
  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <h3> <h4> <em> <i> <strong> <b> <span> <ul> <ol> <li> <blockquote> <object> <embed> <param> <sub> <sup>
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
  • You may embed videos from the following providers vimeo, youtube. Just add the video URL to your textarea in the place where you would like the video to appear, i.e. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pw0jmvdh.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Images can be added to this post.

More information about formatting options